Notes on the State of Virginia (The Norton Library)

Notes on the State of Virginia The Norton Library Thomas Jefferson published one book Notes on the State of Virginia and ever since it has been the touchstone for understanding Jefferson s ideas about republican government the environment educat

  • Title: Notes on the State of Virginia (The Norton Library)
  • Author: Thomas Jefferson William Peden
  • ISBN: 9780393006476
  • Page: 472
  • Format: Paperback
  • Thomas Jefferson published one book, Notes on the State of Virginia, and ever since, it has been the touchstone for understanding Jefferson s ideas about republican government, the environment, education, race and slavery, and Native white relations This edition is the first to present these issues as fundamentally inseparable matters A collection of lively documents accThomas Jefferson published one book, Notes on the State of Virginia, and ever since, it has been the touchstone for understanding Jefferson s ideas about republican government, the environment, education, race and slavery, and Native white relations This edition is the first to present these issues as fundamentally inseparable matters A collection of lively documents accompanies the core text of the Notes, and charts the evolution of the book in the revolutionary crucible and during the heady early days of the new nation An introduction by David Waldstreicher places the work in the contexts of the Revolution and the social and cultural history of Jefferson s Virginia, with particular attention to developing ideas about race and nature A chronology of the life and career of Thomas Jefferson and selected bibliography also add to the pedagogical benefits of this volume.

    • ☆ Notes on the State of Virginia (The Norton Library) || Û PDF Read by  Thomas Jefferson William Peden
      472 Thomas Jefferson William Peden
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Notes on the State of Virginia (The Norton Library) || Û PDF Read by  Thomas Jefferson William Peden
      Posted by:Thomas Jefferson William Peden
      Published :2018-08-11T19:10:36+00:00

    1 thought on “Notes on the State of Virginia (The Norton Library)”

    1. Let's start on a positive note with my favorite zinger:In Great Britain it is said their Constitution relies on the House of Commons for honesty and the Lords for wisdom which would be a rational reliance if honesty were to be bought with money and if wisdom were hereditary.Jefferson has a lot to say about Virginia. Some of it is really interesting, like his discussion of the rivers and passes in the mountains. Some of it is dull, like his list of every Act of Parliament that impacted the border [...]

    2. For the true history buffIn this book Thomas Jefferson repeats questions given to him from different sources and answers each in good order. He covers a lot of details concerning the state of Virginia, including the many tribes of American aborigines, the construction of various buildings, the proposal for an educational system within the state, and remarks about slavery. It was very interesting.

    3. Read for a college course 13 years ago. There’s some worthwhile material buried in this book but the overt racism is what has stuck with me all these years. I remain appalled/disgusted/saddened. If you’re sensitive to black/white race issues, avoid unless you want something to get angry about.

    4. Although I don't agree with everything Jefferson wrote here, I appreciated the insight this work gives into the third president's mind as well more generally for the people of this time period.

    5. Of course this is a brilliant and important book, but (I glance at other commenters and shake my head) if you can't read it historically, don't bother.

    6. I read this for a class recently. It was a chore to get through. The writing was dull, hypocritical, and, of course, racist. If you want an idea of what he was truly like/about, read it.

    7.   Jefferson's only book, an answer to French inquiries regarding Virginia while our allies during the Revolutionary War. Reluctantly published by Jefferson first in France. While showing the amazing range of Jefferson, it also reveals both his conscience and lack thereof. Jefferson knew his standing in France amongst the intellectuals was precarious due to his slave ownership, and in these Notes he provided both a stiff condemnation of slavery (not because it was cruel or unfair or against his [...]

    8. This is a difficult book to rate; the grammar, the spelling, the tone are so different from what I am use to. So, why did I read it? I am taking a free online course through coursera, called History of the Slave South; Queries XIV and XVIII of this book were required reading. I began scanning through the book, and found myself rather engrossed by the book; that is after I made it through the introduction by William Peden. This book is a true early history of Virginia, although I am not positive [...]

    9. Thomas Jefferson likes nothing more than a nice, scientific approach to life. Confused as to how to name all those plants and animals in North America? Don't be - old T.J.'s got a few charts up his sleeve. Minerals? Named! Form of government? Outlined! Rivers of North America? Listed! Church and State? Separated!All of this is very well, if somewhat dull. The juicy bits happen, of course, when he applies that excel-spreadsheet brain of his to that most irrational of subjects: race. At first, he [...]

    10. There is no doubt that the Notes is an extremely important work of (comparatively) early American political, philosophical, and natural theory, and there definitely are some fascinating parts. But there are also parts that simply dragged, or were so intensely based on numbers or exacting descriptions that they are of almost no interest to modern (or casual) readers.What are most interesting are Jefferson's seemingly conflicted ideas about the unethical/impractical condition of slavery but also t [...]

    11. This book is a testament to my own personal strength goodness, Tom, you had a lot of words. The beginning of this was very technical, but to be fair - this was pretty much a textbook. I can't complain. [unfortunately I'm not done with this, I still have to read it, more thoroughly now, and pray for well wishes on my essay Monday! ah, my.]

    12. Though I am a bit of a history buff, I was especially caught up by Jefferson's careful use of logic to deduce the existence of the woolly mammoth as a likely defunct and separate species from the elephant.I yawned my way through his accounts of rivers and minerals, though. Get to the politics, buddy!

    13. If this guy weren't so boring I wouldn't mind that he is so racist! Just kiddinge he's really racist. Plus, his reasoning falls apart when he valorizes Native Americans and criticizes African Americans. In this scenario, whites are more like blacks than whites are like Indians! We're not native to the land either! Weirdo.

    14. Given that I only read a free online version of this book, I may have missed some maps and diagrams. Still, from what I read, this work provided relevant information on the ideology and leadership of Jefferson's time.

    15. This is an informative, interesting study of Virgina in the late 18th-early 19th century. Jefferson's interests in anthropology, linguistics, geography, geology, and many other social and natural sciences are clearly evident in this work.

    16. this book is an important read in it's unabriged version. It illustrates Thomas Jefferson for what he truly was, a racist hippocrite.

    17. A mixed bag, varying between very interesting and incredibly boring. Note that Jefferson's digression on race in chapter 14 is painful for a modern reader.

    18. Rather dry but that man was dedicated; a picture of an early America, complete w/flora & fauna by species (!)

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