Love of Worker Bees

Love of Worker Bees Love of Worker Bees which first appeared in consists of a remarkable novel and two striking short stories written by the most famous and gifted Russian woman of the twentieth century The novel

  • Title: Love of Worker Bees
  • Author: Aleksandra Mijaïlovna Kollontaï Cathy Porter Sheila Rowbotham
  • ISBN: 9780897330015
  • Page: 402
  • Format: Paperback
  • Love of Worker Bees, which first appeared in 1923, consists of a remarkable novel and two striking short stories, written by the most famous and gifted Russian woman of the twentieth century The novel is both a moving love story and a rare graphic portrait of Russian life after the October revolution in 1917 The heroine, Vasilia, struggles to come to terms with her pass Love of Worker Bees, which first appeared in 1923, consists of a remarkable novel and two striking short stories, written by the most famous and gifted Russian woman of the twentieth century The novel is both a moving love story and a rare graphic portrait of Russian life after the October revolution in 1917 The heroine, Vasilia, struggles to come to terms with her passionate love for her husband and the new world that is coming into being around her The two stories, Three Generations and Sisters, provide poignant and fascinating insights into the situation of women The book includes an introduction by the translator with a biographical sketch of Alexandra Kollontai, an afterward by Sheila Rowbotham and a glossary.

    • [PDF] Download À Love of Worker Bees | by ¿ Aleksandra Mijaïlovna Kollontaï Cathy Porter Sheila Rowbotham
      402 Aleksandra Mijaïlovna Kollontaï Cathy Porter Sheila Rowbotham
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download À Love of Worker Bees | by ¿ Aleksandra Mijaïlovna Kollontaï Cathy Porter Sheila Rowbotham
      Posted by:Aleksandra Mijaïlovna Kollontaï Cathy Porter Sheila Rowbotham
      Published :2019-01-26T19:27:14+00:00

    1 thought on “Love of Worker Bees”

    1. I read this book in hopes it would provide a model for writing revolutionary fiction. That it wasn’t. But much of the book was compelling and I read to the conclusion, even after it started telling the same story over and over.Kollontai was required reading for Second Wave Feminists, but back in the Sixties-Seventies, I was too busy organizing to read fiction. How foolish of me. The male characters in distant Russia of 1917-1921 are so familiar. I met every one of them in radical left groups I [...]

    2. don't know quite how to rate this--as a novel or an artifact. 2 stars as novel--all dialogue about relationship problems, but 4 stars as artifact--the novel by the only woman on the bolshevik central committee during the Revolution, she was a famous Free Love advocate and joined the Workers Opposition as the Revolution soured, and by 1921 was out of the Party altogether. I dislike didactic fiction, whether it's Kollantai or Ayn Rand, the heavy-handedness is irredeemable, so I'm rating it as a no [...]

    3. Alexandra Kollontai was, from some reports, the only woman in Lenin's cabinet, and from others one of two. Regardless, she was one among many. She has written several works of fiction regarding the sad lives of men and women during and after the Bolshevik revolution. I found reading this book, as well as others she has written, somewhat twisted because of her mind set toward women, sex, and marriage. But then, I suppose you had to be there. She was pretty radical, for her time, speaking openly a [...]

    4. Love of Worker Bees is set in Russia after the revolution of October 1917. Kollontai graphically depicts the contradictions of everyday life and the sexual relations between men and women during this period. It questions notions of bourgeois morality and how this have become part of revolutionary Russia in the 1920's. In three separate stories Kollontai ahead of her time wrestle with the question of a new morality and the sexual emancipation of women in Russia through the lives of three women in [...]

    5. A relic of 20s Soviet life, suitably revived with intelligent (if spoilerific) introduction and a further, shorter essay. A novel and two short stories allow women to discuss small-p politics - sexual politics, the politics of family and so on - as seen against the time of the greatest big-P Political changes arguably ever known. The novel is more of a specialist text - you would probably need a knowledge of Soviet politics and history - but the short stories are clearer and more universal. Perh [...]

    6. Perhaps what this book (or collection of stories) lacks in fluidity, it makes up for in straightforwardness. The first story which is highly biographical (I read Kollontai's auto-biography right before this), but seeks to justify why Kollontai felt so disappointed with the state of relationships in the Bolshevik era. But these stories don't come across as a lament or inability to move on from the author, but rather to tie universal truths of love (the excitement, drama, complacency, and eventual [...]

    7. Kollontai was an astounding woman – a Russian aristocrat, member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party in 1917, on the left of the Party, a feminist, and later ambassador to Norway. Amid all her, often extremely good, political writing she also found time to write novels, or in this case three conceptually linked pieces, a novella and two short stories, first published in thre Soviet Union in 1923, condemned as too sexually explicit and relegated to the archives. I suspect that part [...]

    8. This is a great book about a Bolshevik woman in the Russian Revolution and her love life, and problems she has balancing her political work with her love commitments. She also has to deal with a nonmonogamous husband who wants her to be a housewife. The man-woman relationships are so similar to contemporary ones that it is eerie. Kollontai also implies that friendships and relations with women (such as mother-daughter) are more empowering and satisfying than those with men (also something that s [...]

    9. Love of Worker BeesSet in Russia after the 1917 revolution Kollontai delves into the sexual emancipation of women. She speaks openly about marriage and women and Russian society. As the only female member of the Central Committee of the Communist party, her novel and two short stories that comprise this book, provide a glimpse into socialist Russia from a woman’s point of view. It’s a love story and also a look in, to post 1917 Russian life. Could be well-used in a university sociology cours [...]

    10. I wasn't sure whether to rate this as a historical document or a literary work, so I aimed for the middle. As a historical document, it is a prime example of communist feminism. As a literary work, it's engaging, but a little dialogue heavy (which is something I hardly say about anything). Mostly, though, Vasilisa's attitude toward her husband made me want to pitch the book through the nearest window, but it's also very telling of what was probably the average situation for many Russian women of [...]

    11. Vasalisa can sometimes be a little frustrating as a character, but the book is definitely compelling. I'd definitely recommend giving it a read, especially if you're interested in the early Bolshevik Revolution.

    12. My bro recommended this book when I was in grade school. If you're at all interested in the sociological aspect of early communist society in the USSR - this is a great book. Of course, after re-reading it, I missed a lot of things the first time over and I find it even more compelling!

    13. This was a very enjoyable read! The characters are complex and endearing, and the historical context is very interesting.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *